Types of Adult Incontinence

Types of Adult Incontinence

A common and often very distressing problem amongst adults, adult incontinence is the loss of control in the bladder area. This would mean that a person suffering from this problem have difficulty in controlling the flow and amount of his urine. Leaking a small amount of urine when a person coughs or laughs too much is quite common to people of different ages. For a person with serious urinary problems, however, the urge is not only uncontrollable, the frequency of occurrence and the amount of urine leakage is too much and would actually require a person to wear adult diapers everyday.

Millions of people all throughout the world suffer from this problem. This is a common occurrence in people over fifty years of age, and happens more on women than men. This may also happen to young women who have just given birth. Embarrassing as it is, this condition can be treated.

The following are types of adult incontinence:

• Stress Incontinence - this is also commonly known as effort incontinence. This results from weakened pelvic floor muscles. A person with this type of urinary problem loses small amounts of urine doing common movements that increases abdominal pressure such as laughing too much, sneezing and even exercising. If the support of the fascia in the pelvic floor is not strong enough, increased abdominal pressure will cause the urethra to move downward, which would allow urine to pass.
• Urge Incontinence – this type of problem causes urine leakage for no apparent reason and increases the person’s urge to urinate. Medical professionals describe the bladder or the person suffering from it as spastic, unstable and even overactive. This usually happens during sleep, after a person drinks a small amount of water, and some, by just hearing the sound of the water running.
• Functional Incontinence – this happens when a person feels the need to urinate but, due to limited mobility, cannot physically make it to the bathroom. People suffering from this type may have problems thinking, communicating or even moving that might prevent them from actually reaching the toilet. Patients with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, poor dexterity and even old people in a wheel chair are the ones often experience this type of urinary problem.
• Overflow Incontinence – people with this type of incontinence have bladders that continue to dribble or flow, even after passing urine, hence the name. This occurs when a person’s bladder is always full; weak bladder muscles results to incomplete emptying of urine and blocked urethra.
• Structural Incontinence – this type usually happens during childhood but rarely causes incontinence during a person’s adult stage. This results from ectopic urether which is treatable and does not pose any serious problems afterwards.
• Bedwetting – although considered as a type of incontinence, bedwetting is a common occurrence in childhood and do not result in any serious urinary problem in the future.
Make sure to talk consult with a medical professional if you have problems concerning the bladder. Hiding it because of fear of embarrassment might result in more serious medical conditions such as rashes, skin infections, sores and even urinary tract infection. Keep in mind that this condition is not only treatable but also common in millions of people all throughout.